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Why do I have neck and shoulder discomfort at the computer - Dr Erick Peper

Why do I have neck and shoulder discomfort at the computer - Dr Erick Peper

Posted on: 2020-07-27 Louise

While working in front of screens, many of us suffer from Zoom/screen fatigue, iNeck, shoulder and back discomfort, tired eyes, exhaustion and screen addiction (Peper, 2020Fosslien & Duffy, 2020; So, Cheng & Szeto, 2017Peper & Harvey, 2018).


As we work, our shoulders and forearms tense and we are often not aware of this until someone mentions it. Many accept the discomfort and pain as the cost of doing work–not realizing that it may be possible to work without pain.


See full article and further information / You Tube Clips etc via link below:


https://peperperspective.com/2020/07/23/why-do-i-have-neck-and-shoulder-discomfort-at-the-computer/



Rhythm of Breathing Affects Memory and Fear

Rhythm of Breathing Affects Memory and Fear

Posted on: 2020-07-27 Louise

Nasal Respiration Entrains Human Limbic Oscillations and Modulates Cognitive Function

The need to breathe links the mammalian olfactory system inextricably to the respiratory rhythms that draw air through the nose. In rodents and other small animals, slow oscillations of local field potential activity are driven at the rate of breathing (∼2–12 Hz) in olfactory bulb and cortex, and faster oscillatory bursts are coupled to specific phases of the respiratory cycle. These dynamic rhythms are thought to regulate cortical excitability and coordinate network interactions, helping to shape olfactory coding, memory, and behavior. However, while respiratory oscillations are a ubiquitous hallmark of olfactory system function in animals, direct evidence for such patterns is lacking in humans. In this study, we acquired intracranial EEG data from rare patients (Ps) with medically refractory epilepsy, enabling us to test the hypothesis that cortical oscillatory activity would be entrained to the human respiratory cycle, albeit at the much slower rhythm of ∼0.16–0.33 Hz. Our results reveal that natural breathing synchronizes electrical activity in human piriform (olfactory) cortex, as well as in limbic-related brain areas, including amygdala and hippocampus. Notably, oscillatory power peaked during inspiration and dissipated when breathing was diverted from nose to mouth. Parallel behavioral experiments showed that breathing phase enhances fear discrimination and memory retrieval. Our findings provide a unique framework for understanding the pivotal role of nasal breathing in coordinating neuronal oscillations to support stimulus processing and behavior.

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animal studies have long shown that olfactory oscillatory activity emerges in line with the natural rhythm of breathing, even in the absence of an odor stimulus. Whether the breathing cycle induces cortical oscillations in the human brain is poorly understood. In this study, we collected intracranial EEG data from rare patients with medically intractable epilepsy, and found evidence for respiratory entrainment of local field potential activity in human piriform cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus. These effects diminished when breathing was diverted to the mouth, highlighting the importance of nasal airflow for generating respiratory oscillations. Finally, behavioral data in healthy subjects suggest that breathing phase systematically influences cognitive tasks related to amygdala and hippocampal functions.

“Nasal Respiration Entrains Human Limbic Oscillations and Modulates Cognitive Function” by Christina Zelano, Heidi Jiang, Guangyu Zhou, Nikita Arora, Stephan Schuele, Joshua Rosenow and Jay A. Gottfried in Journal of Neuroscience. Published online December 7 2016 doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2586-16.2016


https://neurosciencenews.com/memory-fear-breathing-5699/

Vagotomy and subsequent risk of Parkinson’s disease

Vagotomy and subsequent risk of Parkinson’s disease

Posted on: 2020-07-27 Louise

Vagotomy and subsequent risk of Parkinson’s disease

Objectives: Parkinson’s disease (PD) may be caused by an enteric neurotropic pathogen entering the brain through the vagal nerve, a process that may take over 20 years. We investigated the risk of PD in patients who underwent vagotomy, and hypothesized that truncal vagotomy is associated with a protective effect, while super-selective vagotomy has a minor effect.

Methods: We constructed cohorts of all patients in Denmark who underwent vagotomy during 1977-1995 and a matched general population cohort, by linking Danish registries. We used Cox regression to compute hazard ratios (HRs) for PD and corresponding 95% confidence intervals [CIs], adjusting for potential confounders.

Results: Risk of PD was decreased in patients who underwent truncal [HR = 0.85, 95% CI= 0.56–1.27; follow-up of >20 years: HR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.28–1.20] compared to super-selective vagotomy. Risk of PD was also decreased following truncal vagotomy when compared to the general population cohort [overall adjusted HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.63–1.14; follow-up >20 years, adjusted HR = 0.53 [95% CI: 0.28–0.99]. In patients who underwent super-selective vagotomy, risk of PD was similar to the general population [HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.84–1.43; follow-up of >20 years: HR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.80–1.70]. The statistical precision of the risk estimates was limited. Results were consistent after external adjustment for unmeasured confounding by smoking.

Interpretation: Full truncal vagotomy is associated with a decreased risk for subsequent PD, suggesting that the vagal nerve may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of PD.

“Vagotomy and subsequent risk of Parkinson’s disease” by Elisabeth Svensson PhD, Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó PhD, Reimar W Thomsen PhD, Jens Christian Djurhuus DMSc, Lars Pedersen PhD, Per Borghammer DMSc and Henrik Toft Sørensen DMSc in Annals of Neurology. Published online June 2015 doi:10.1002/ana.24448


https://neurosciencenews.com/parkinsons-gastrointestinal-tract-neurology-2150/

Coronavirus and the Brain - Sapiens Lab

Coronavirus and the Brain - Sapiens Lab

Posted on: 2020-07-14 Louise

Coronaviruses can be ‘neuroinvasive’ and have impacts on the brain from inflammation to demyelination


With the psyche of the entire world consumed by Coronavirus, as fellow brain researchers you may have wondered if Coronaviruses can get into the brain, and if so, what they do there. The short answer is yes they can, and they do many unpleasant things.

Coronavirus 101

First some basics on the Coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses of which Covid-19 is just one. They are spherical virions with spike-like projections on the surface that give the appearance of a solar corona – hence the name. The virion encapsulation or envelope is essentially made of lipids. Within the virion is the nucleocapsid that houses its positive-sense single stranded RNA. What this means is that the RNA can function as both a genome and mRNA which can be translated into proteins using the ribosomes of the host cell. The genome of coronaviruses are much heavier than most viruses and encode all the major proteins required for their assembly.

How do they get into the brain?

Coronaviruses are one of several virus families that are considered ‘neuropathological’. Others include the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), the influenza virus (IV) and the human metapneumovirus (hMPV). Generally the blood brain barrier does a good job of keeping out these viruses. However, sometimes respiratory coronaviruses are able to jump the blood brain barrier and find their way in. While exactly how they do this is not known, the main path appears to be through the olfactory bulb. Other ways may be by entry through the vagus nerve which has been found in cases of influenza viruses. From a molecular perspective studies suggest that this requires some compromise of the tight junctions in the blood brain barrier which may arise from inflammation. That said, the specific mechanism by which this happens seems to be unknown. Once they get into the brain however, they can permeate the CNS in less than 7 days and begin to appear in cerebrospinal fluid.

Which coronaviruses have been found in the brain?

One hypothesis is that the more virulent the coronavirus, the more likely it is to be neuroinvasive. SARS for example, which is a coronavirus, has been found in the brain. An autopsy study of 18 SARS patients found SARS viral particles and genomic sequence in neurons from the brain in addition to a number of other organs. Other strains of coronavirus (e.g. 229E) have also been found in the brains of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) which brings us to the effects of neuroinvasion of coronaviruses.

Effect of coronavirus on the brain

Coronaviruses in the brain can cause all kinds of havoc. They can cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or the brain and spinal cord (encephalomyelitis) which can result in various acute symptoms such as the usual headaches and fevers but also febrile seizures, status epilecticus, convulsions and loss of consciousness. More insidious perhaps is the effect of demyelination leading to coronavirus as a suspect in the onset of MS. Some studies suggest that they are gliotropic since coronavirus infection causes glia to release all sorts of factors including interleukins which are inflammatory proteins and chemokines that are involved in the onset of MS.

Finally, besides all the neurological effects but there could well be long lasting cognitive and mental effects as well. They simply haven’t been studied. As this coronavirus pandemic progresses, we may be about to find out.

 

References

Desforges M et al., Viruses, 12 (1) 2019 Dec 20 Human Coronaviruses and Other Respiratory Viruses: Underestimated Opportunistic Pathogens of the Central Nervous System?

Bohmwald K. et al., Front Cell Neurosci. 2018; 12: 386. 2018 Oct 26. Neurologic Alterations Due to Respiratory Virus Infections

Bleau et al, J Virol, 89 (19), 9896-908, Oct 2015 Brain Invasion by Mouse Hepatitis Virus Depends on Impairment of Tight Junctions and Beta Interferon Production in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

 

Post navigation

Link : https://sapienlabs.org/coronavirus-and-the-brain/


Structural and Dynamical Changes in The Developing Brain - Sapiens Lab

Structural and Dynamical Changes in The Developing Brain - Sapiens Lab

Posted on: 2020-07-14 Louise

Here we provide two perspectives on the developing brain from the Inter- and Intra person Variability symposium held last year.

Individual Differences in Human Brain Development

by Dr. Kate Mills, Department of Psychology at the University of Oregon

This talk discusses structural changes from early childhood to adulthood using MRI focusing on aspects such as grey matter volume, cortical thickness and surface area. In particular it highlights individual differences and the implications of these differences.


Link to this talk/info : https://sapienlabs.org/structural-and-dynamical-changes-in-the-developing-brain/

Resolve Eyestrain and Screen Fatigue

Resolve Eyestrain and Screen Fatigue

Posted on: 2020-06-30 Louise

Forty percent of adults and eighty percent of teenagers report experiencing significant visual symptoms (eyestrain, blurry vision, dry eyes, headaches, and exhaustion) during and immediately after viewing electronic displays. These ‘technology-associated overuse’ symptoms are often labeled as digital eyestrain or computer vision syndrome (Rosenfield, 2016Randolph & Cohn, 2017). Even our distant vision may be affected— after working in front of a screen for hours, the world looks blurry. At the same time, we may experience an increase in neck, shoulders and back discomfort. These symptoms increase as we spend more hours looking at computer screens, laptops, tablets, e-readers, gaming consoles, and cellphones for work, taking online classes, watching streaming videos for entertainment, and keeping connected with friends and family (Borhany et al, 2018Turgut, 2018Jensen et al, 2002).


Read Full article : https://peperperspective.com/2020/06/29/resolve-eyestrain-and-screen-fatigue/

Change your breathing pattern to reduce corona virus exposure

Change your breathing pattern to reduce corona virus exposure

Posted on: 2020-04-02 Louise

Change your breathing pattern to reduce coronavirus exposure


Posted: April 1, 2020 | Author: erikpeper | Filed under: Breathing/respirationhealthrelaxationself-healingUncategorized | Tags: coronavirusCOVID-19 |4 Comments

This blog is based upon our breathing research that began in the 1990s, This research helped identify dysfunctional breathing patterns that could contribute to illness. We developed coaching/teaching strategies with biofeedback to optimize breathing patterns, improve health and performance (Peper and Tibbetts, 1994Peper, Martinez Aranda and Moss, 2015Peper, Mason, and Huey, 2017).

For example, people with asthma were taught to reduce their reactivity to cigarette smoke and other airborne irritants (Peper and Tibbitts, 1992Peper and Tibbetts, 2003). The participants first learned effortless slow diaphragmatic breathing and then were taught that the moment they would become aware of an airborne irritant such as cigarette smoke, they would hold their breath and relax their body. Then they moved away from the polluted air while exhaling very slowly through their nose and when the air was clearer they would inhale and continue effortless diaphragmatically breathing (Peper and Tibbetts, 1994). From this research we propose that people may reduce exposure to the coronavirus by changing their breathing pattern; however the first step is prevention by following the recommended public health guidelines.

  • Social distancing (physical distancing while continuing to offer social support)
  • Washing your hands with soap for at least 20 seconds
  • Not touching your face
  • Cleaning surfaces which could have been touched by other such as door bell, door knobs, packages.
  • Wearing a mask and gloves

Reduce your exposure to the virus when near other people by changing your breathing pattern 

Normally when startled or surprised, we tend to gasp and inhale air rapidly. When someone sneezes, coughs or exhales near you, we often respond with a slight gasp and inhale their droplets. To reduce inhaling their droplets (which may contain the coronavirus virus), implement the following:

  • When a person is getting too close
  • Hold your breath with your mouth closed and relax your shoulders (just pause your breathing) as you move away from the person.
  • Gently exhale through your nose (do not inhale before exhaling)-just exhale how little or much air you have
  • When far enough away, gently inhale through your nose.
  • Remember to relax and feel your shoulders drop when holding your breath. It will last for only a few seconds as you move away from the person. Exhale before inhaling through your nose.
  • When a person coughs or sneezes
  • Hold your breath, rotate you head away from the person and move away from them while exhaling though your nose.
  • If you think the droplets of the sneeze or cough have landed on you or your clothing, go home, disrobe outside your house, and put your clothing into the washing machine. Take a shower and wash yourself with soap.
  • When passing a person ahead of you or who is approaching you
  • Inhale before they are too close and exhale through your nose as you are passing them.
  • After you are more than 6 feet away gently inhale through your nose.
  • When talking to people outside
  • Stand so that the breeze/wind hits both people from the same side so that the exhaled droplets are blown away from both of you (down wind).

These breathing skills seem so simple; however, in our experience with people with asthma and other symptoms, it took practice, practice, and practice to change their automatic breathing patterns. The new pattern is pause (stop) the breath and then exhale through your nose. Remember, this breathing pattern is not forced and with practice it will occur effortlessly.

The following blogs offer instructions for mastering effortless diaphragmatic breathing.

https://peperperspective.com/2017/06/23/healing-irritable-bowel-syndrome-with-diaphragmatic-breathing/

https://peperperspective.com/2018/10/04/breathing-reduces-acid-reflux-and-dysmenorrhea-discomfort/

https://peperperspective.com/2019/03/24/anxiety-lightheadedness-palpitations-prodromal-migraine-symptoms-breathing-to-the-rescue/

https://peperperspective.com/2017/03/19/enjoy-sex-breathe-away-the-pain/

https://peperperspective.com/2015/02/18/reduce-hot-flashes-and-premenstrual-symptoms-with-breathing/

https://peperperspective.com/2015/09/25/resolving-pelvic-floor-pain-a-case-report/

References

Peper, E., Martinez Aranda, P., & Moss, E. (2015). Vulvodynia treated successfully with breathing biofeedback and integrated stress reduction: A case report. Biofeedback. 43(2), 103-109.

Peper, E., Mason, L., Huey, C. (2017). Healing irritable bowel syndrome with diaphragmatic breathing. Biofeedback. (45-4)/

Peper, E., and Tibbetts, V. (1992). Fifteen-Month follow up with asthmatics utilizing EMG/Incentive inspirometer feedback. Bio­feedback and Self-Regulation. 17 (2), 143-151. 

Peper, E. & Tibbetts, V. (1994). Effortless diaphragmatic breathing. Physical Therapy Products. 6(2), 67-71. Also in:  Electromyography: Applications in Physical Therapy. Montreal: Thought Technology Ltd. 

Peper, E. and Tibbitts, V. (2003). Protocol for the treatment of asthma. In: Zheng, Y. (ed).  Clinical Practice of Biofeedback. Beijing: High Education Press (HEP). 163-176. ISBN 7-04-011420-8

 

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Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn't work

Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn't work

Posted on: 2019-08-06 Louise

"No one is talking about evaluating for obstructive sleep apnea as a potential cause of treatment-resistant depression, which occurs in about 50 percent of patients with major depressive disorder," says McCall, corresponding author of the study in The Journal of Psychiatric Research. Now he hopes they will.

The investigators found clinically relevant disease in 14 percent of 125 adult patients with major depressive disorder, insomnia and suicidal thoughts, even though the sleep-wrecking apnea was an exclusion criterion for the original study.


Read more : https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190723104041.htm

Traumatic brain injuries in under-19s caused by consumer products or sport

Traumatic brain injuries in under-19s caused by consumer products or sport

Posted on: 2019-08-06 Louise

Authors reviewed injury surveillance data from over four years, from (inclusive of) 2010 to 2013. They focused on children and adolescents in five age groups between 0 to 19 years and identified the products associated with their injuries. The investigation provides a comprehensive understanding of the contribution of consumer product-related traumatic brain injuries in children and adolescents.

Children and adolescents accounted for approximately one million non-fatal traumatic brain injury cases treated in emergency departments per year.

In infants under a year, a quarter were caused by falling from beds, while floors were the second leading cause at 14%.

The authors highlight bunk beds as especially risky. In children aged one to four years, 10% were caused by beds, 10% by stairs and 10% by floors.

As children became more mobile, the leading causes of head injuries moved outside the home.

  • At aged five to nine years, floors were still the leading cause (6%), but bicycle accidents came second at 5%.
  • In the final two age groups, 10-14 years and 15-19 years, American football was the leading cause of traumatic brain injury -- at 14% in the younger age group and 9% in the oldest. Basketball came second at 6% and 5% respectively.
  • Other activities that contributed to traumatic brain injuries in the final two age groups included bicycles (5% in 10 to 14-year-olds and 3% in 15 to 19-year-olds) and soccer (5% in 10 to 14-year-olds and 4% in 15 to 19-year-olds).


Read more : https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190729094545.htm

Brain region linked to altered social interactions in autism model

Brain region linked to altered social interactions in autism model

Posted on: 2019-08-06 Louise

A new study by neuroscientists at MIT and colleagues in China provides clues to the neural circuits underlying social deficits associated with ASD. The paper, published in Nature Neuroscience, found that structural and functional impairments in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of SHANK3 mutant mice are linked to altered social interactions.


Read : https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190729094551.htm

Blue light at night increases the consumption of sweets in rats

Blue light at night increases the consumption of sweets in rats

Posted on: 2019-07-23 Louise



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190709091120.htm

A Consumer’s Guide to Understanding QEEG Brain Mapping and Neurofeedback Training

A Consumer’s Guide to Understanding QEEG Brain Mapping and Neurofeedback Training

Posted on: 2019-07-23 Louise

A Consumers Guide to Understanding QEEG Brain Mapping and Neurofeedback Training is written for the consumers. If you are considering participating in neurofeedback or a parent of a child, a relative, a colleague, or a friend who is looking to participate in neurofeedback brain wave training, this booklet is designed to inform you about the process of being assessed for and participating in neurofeedback. This booklet covers the very basics of what the reader needs to know and understand regarding neurofeedback. What is neurofeedback? How is a person assessed for participating in neurofeedback? What are the benefits? What, if any, are the side effects? How does one know it is helping? Does it require lifestyle changes? How long do the benefits last? What happens if it does not help? And many more such questions and issues are addressed.


This manual by Dr Longo is a basic guide that clinicians can keep at their practice for clients to read about the basic concepts of QEEG and Neurofeedback.

Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, BCN

Serendipity Neurofeedback Services



Order this book online : https://www.amazon.com/dp/1532047312




Order this book online : https://www.amazon.com/dp/1532047312

Posture Feedback and your Health

Posture Feedback and your Health

Posted on: 2019-07-02 Louise

“Don’t slouch!” Improve health with posture feedback, that describes the use of a wearable posture feedback device.

https://peperperspective.com/2019/07/01/dont-slouch-improves-health-with-posture-feedback/

Biofeedback and Self Healing strategies by Dr Eric Peper

Biofeedback and Self Healing strategies by Dr Eric Peper

Posted on: 2019-05-29 Louise

Self-healing strategies that participants have used to reduce or eliminate acid reflux acid reflux, anxiety, dyspareunia, eczema, epilepsy, headache, IBS, irritability, hot flashes, neck tension, psoriasis, smoking, test anxiety, and vulvodyniaself-healing strategies that participants have used to reduce or eliminate acid reflux acid reflux, anxiety, dyspareunia, eczema, epilepsy, headache, IBS, irritability, hot flashes, neck tension, psoriasis, smoking, test anxiety, and vulvodynia


Link to his articles

https://peperperspective.com/2019/05/27/do-self-healing-first/

Neck Stiffness and Pain - how to relieve and prevent it - Dr Eric Peper

Neck Stiffness and Pain - how to relieve and prevent it - Dr Eric Peper

Posted on: 2019-05-27 Louise

Relieve and prevent neck stiffness and pain

Posted: May 21, 2019 | Author: erikpeper | Filed under: behaviorExercise/movementhealthNeck and shoulder discomfortPain/discomfortposture, muscle tensionneck painneck stiffnessvision 


Click on link below to reach Dr Peper's blog :


https://peperperspective.com/2019/05/21/relieve-and-prevent-neck-stiffness-and-pain/

Effect of EEG Reference Choice on Outcomes

Effect of EEG Reference Choice on Outcomes

Posted on: 2019-03-19 Louise

Read this article on the Sapienlab website (see link below)


In EEG, voltages recorded at each electrode are computed with reference to another electrode. The choice of this electrode reference impacts a number of EEG measures.

Choice of the reference electrode location is one the most critical issues in EEG recording. It impacts not only the amplitude of the recorded potential but also its temporal structure. For example, consider the visual evoked potential (VEP) recorded from the occipital electrode O2 against electrodes placed in the mid-line (a), frontal (b) and temporal areas (c) [1].



https://sapienlabs.co/effect-of-eeg-reference-choice-on-outcomes

Exercise improves your health, mood and cognitive functions

Exercise improves your health, mood and cognitive functions

Posted on: 2019-05-26

You may enjoy my latest two blogs which focus on the importance of movement and exercise. The blog, Exercise improves your health, mood and cognitive functions, includes short videos that discuss how that the nervous system evolved to coordinate movement. 

https://peperperspective.com/2017/07/22/exercise-improve-your-health-mood-and-cognitive-function/